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Doing English

You Get What You Deserve

in The Doing English Blog

I’m a big fan of Earl Nightingale.

And of this quote:

“The world in which we live and work is a mirror of our attitude and expectations.”

What this quote essentially means is that we tend to attract people who are like us.

Like begets like.

Or to put it another way, you get back what you deserve.

A 30 Day Challenge

Earl Nightingale issued a challenge.

For the next 30 days, treat everyone you meet as if they were the most important person in the world. Whether it’s the checkout girl at the supermarket you go to, the guy working at the petrol station where you fill your car up, or a barista in Starbucks.

It doesn’t matter.

Treat each and every one of those people as if they were the most important person in the world, and watch how that transforms the way they treat you.

Treat someone with respect and he will treat you with respect back.

Fail to do so?

And don’t be surprised when he fails to do so too.

If You Want My Help

If you are frustrated and struggling, click here and consume my free training.

In it, you’ll learn the five key changes that you need to make to your English learning routine to see massive progress with your English speaking.

Alternatively, if you want my help, right here, right now, to transform your English and use it to do amazing things in your life, click here and book your own free consultation call with me. We’ll talk about how I can help you with your English transformation.

Best,
Julian

P.S. Click here to watch my Free Training where I teach you my “Rocket Launch” Method.

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Is This Why You Struggle in English?

in The Doing English Blog

This made my ex-student weep in frustration.

Perhaps it does you too?

Way back in the day, when I was first in Japan and I was working at a conversation school. Mainly taught adults who used English in business.

My Student’s Email trauma

One of my students there worked at an international school. And he had to send emails quite regularly to other teachers living in the U.S.

It would take him more than hour to draft an email, he said.

He would have to plan the email. Write it. Get it checked. And it would take a long time to produce his email… which he would eventually send.

And to his utter dismay and frustration….

10 seconds later…

*PING*

… a reply would come from his American counterparts.

And the whole process would start again.

It’s so frustrating!

“It’s so frustrating,” he said.

“It’s not fair! It takes me an hour to plan and send these emails and they just write and send it back in 30 seconds!

Why do I have to learn English as a second language? Why do I have to use English with them? They should learn and do it in Japanese!”

Life ain’t fair

Look – it’s not fair.

Life ain’t fair.

But it is balanced. We all have our own advantages and our own disadvantages. You’ve just got to make the best of them.

But more to the point

When I really looked into this person’s problem, it was very obvious the way he was writing emails actually wasn’t appropriate for what he was doing… and that was making him take FAR too long.

You see, the Japanese style of business email writing is quite involved and quite formal.

They start with a very formal greeting and then they flow into quite a large body of text. And to an extent, the longer the email, the more polite it is.

Not so in Western countries.

We want to get to the core of the important information, quick ‘n’ dirty.

We don’t care about all the fluff.

Just get to the bloody point, NOW, fast.

Culture First, English Second

You can’t just translate everything you do now into English and expect it to be appropriate. You need to really think about how people think. And how culturally appropriate what you do in English is.

If you’re not sure just how important this is, watch this video:

↑ this is a segment form a seminar I gave to a group in Tokyo.

Watch it.

You’ll learn something useful.

If You Want My Help

If you are frustrated and struggling, click here and consume my free training.

In it, you’ll learn the five key changes that you need to make to your English learning routine to see massive progress with your English speaking.

Alternatively, if you want my help, right here, right now, to transform your English and use it to do amazing things in your life, click here and book your own free consultation call with me. We’ll talk about how I can help you with your English transformation.

Best,
Julian

P.S. Click here to watch my Free Training where I teach you my “Rocket Launch” Method.

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Whose goals are you chasing?

in The Doing English Blog

Whose goals, exactly, are you chasing?

There’s an old story about a dog who chases cars.

Every day he runs out of the house barking, chasing cars that go past.

Of course, he never catches them.

The cars are much too fast for this poor old dog. But one day, the owner asks an important question:

“What do you think he would do if he actually caught one?”

… to which nobody had an answer.

Why are you chasing English?

This is an important question because it tells us all goals must have something at the end of them. Often we get caught up in chasing goals that really don’t have any meaning attached to them.

We are chasing the goal…

But at the end of the day, we’re not really too sure why.

And if we do complete them?

So what?

We’re not sure what we’re going to actually do with it now.

Chasing Other People’s Dreams

A good example of this is chasing other peoples’ dreams.

An obvious example being people whose parents tell them they must learn English… so that’s what they try to do. But they’re not really sure for themselves why they need English.

Yes, I’ve done it too…

I’ve fallen into the same trap.

A while ago, my coach and mentor asked me, “Julian, whose goals are you chasing?” At the time I thought I was heading in the right direction… but when I thought about it, the goal that I was chasing (to get a million subscribers on YouTube) actually meant nothing to me.

At the end of the day, I don’t care about those numbers.

Ultimately I’m not interested in a business with hundreds and thousands of clients all over the place, and I just don’t work well like that.

I work best with a very small number of people, working together with them very, very closely. So it’s better for me to set goals that MATCH that.

What are you trying to do?

So ask yourself this question, “What exactly is it that I am trying to accomplish with English?”

It’s imperative you understand that.

Otherwise, you’re just going to waste time chasing cars that, at the end of the day, you don’t really want to catch.

How I Can Help

I can help, of course, and if you want to get started with my help for free, you can. Click here and study my free training. In it, I will show you the 5 key changes that you need to make to transform your English speaking.

Best,
Julian

P.S. Click here to watch my Free Training where I teach you my “Rocket Launch” Method.

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