Ireland, Abortion and my Take on Religion

Three years ago Ireland voted “Yes” for same-sex marriage. And yesterday they voted “Yes” to allow safe and legal abortions.

This is a big deal. Though frankly, it’s backwards and medieval that this vote was even necessary. Nobody—nobody—has the right to tell anyone what they can and can’t do with their own bodies. Especially not a misogynistic organisation famous for trying to cover up its kiddy-fiddling (that’s paedophilia in plain English… yanno, abusing the children they don’t want you to abort). But equally importantly, it’s yet more evidence that the church is losing its power to dictate and control people’s lives.

Jon Shelby Spong, a retired American bishop argues that:

“The Church doesn’t like people to grow up; because you can’t control grown-ups”

… well, well done to Ireland for growing up I say.

Best,
Julian

P.S. If you’re interested in British and Irish Culture, have a look at British Stories (which right now comes with my “The Full Irish” mini-course as a bonus) ー Here.

 

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Julian Northbrook

Julian Northbrook is an unconventional punk of the business English learning world. A leading expert in English education and direct response marketing, he’s fully equipped to drag you kicking and screaming from English-mediocracy to speaking at an outstanding level. After being turned down for his dream job in the art industry, Julian suffered three long years as a crap Japanese speaker. He understands exactly what it’s like to feel like a total idiot every time you speak. But Julian overcame his language problems, mastered the language, and went on to work first as a freelance translator, then as an executive member of a Japanese company. But he soon grew sick of the corporate world and left it to pursue something infinitely more satisfying — running his own business helping small business owners and entrepreneurs get so good at English that they forget that it’s not their first language. He writes the infamous Doing English Daily Newsletter which you can (and should) subscribe to.

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