Get “Business Basics” For Free

Announcement time.

I’ve got a new course coming soon.

It’s called “Business Basics”, and it’s for people who need to get the basics of using English in office and business situations, fast.

Or for people who need a refresher. Which seeing as the fundamentals should be resisted regularly anyway is basically everyone.

If you don’t know how to….

– Say good morning and goodbye in a way that makes you sound smooth.
– Get someone’s attention without sounding rude and annoying.
– Introduce a third person well (or be introduced).
– Ask someone to clarify something that they’ve shown you previously (without sounding rude and annoying)
– Talk on the phone politely and effectively….

… and a whole load more….

… then this course is for you.

Normally I would do a pre-sell on this, etc. etc. but to be honest I’ve been busy as hell over the last few weeks with research, and I just can’t be bothered to do something complicated.

So let’s make it simple.

Current EES Members and people who join before the end of this month are going to get the course for free.

That’s it.

The first couple of lessons are already up and ready to go.

The rest will be done shortly.

Click here to Join Julian Northbrook’s League of Extraordinary English Speakers (EES)

… and the bonus “Business Basics” course will be added to your account.

The Deadline for this will be Halloween.

Start your membership here.

Cheers,

Julian Northbrook
Language Punk. Going Back to Basics.

P.S. Talking about research…

I’m analysing all the data form the project that you might have helped me with a while ago (depending on when you subscribed to the Newsletter).

As soon as I’m ready I’ll write about the results here.

In the meantime…

Click here to Join Julian Northbrook’s League of Extraordinary English Speakers (EES)

 

 

A Productive Day

Today was a good day.

A very, very productive one in fact.

I did absolutely nothing.

Well, that’s not true. I rolled around on the sofa drinking coffee and reading my crime-mystery novel until about 11am, when we put a film on. Then after lunch I polished my boots (all of them) and dusted the shelves in my office.

After that I read my book again….

… then went to the supermarket with my daughter to get a bottle of wine to go with dinner tonight.

Once I’ve finished this email I’ll probably go back to my book.

Productive because this’ll all let me get lots done over the next week. A rested brain is an awesome machine.

But a tired one is worthless.

This last couple of week’s I’ve been waaaay to busy with too many things.

Not to Least Business Basics…

And planning for a (Japanese language) seminar I’ll do next week.

The result of all that is that when I came to do my data analysis yesterday, the whole thing was a total waste of time. I made several mistakes in preparing the data and ultimately wasted most of the day.

Again —

A tired brain is next to useless.

With that, I’m going back to rolling around on the sofa. Tomorrow I’ll be telling you how you can get the new Business Basics course for free.

Tomorrow.

In the meantime…

Click here to start your EES membership.

As well as the weekly lessons to you get access to more than 100 past lessons in the archive, the “Extraordinary English Conversations” series. the monthly EES Gazette through your door (dedicated to executing your English in the real world), feedback and critique on your English from me, access to the Community, and much, much more.

Join Julian Northbrook’s League of Extraordinary English Speakers here

Cheers,

Julian Northbrook
Language Punk. Resting.

Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis

Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious is not the longest word in English.

Sure, it’s a pretty excellent word (pun intended).

And yes, a lot of people believe it is the longest. But that’s just because way waaaaay too many people still watch Mary Poppins (the film made my stomach churn even when I was a kid).

The longest word is in fact…

Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis.

It’s a kind of lung disease.

Thing is though, unless you’re a lung-surgeon or Mary Poppins, both of these words are probably totally useless to you and ironically even then about the only place you’ll ever read pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis is in an article about the longest word in English.

Making them totally useless.

Which to be honest, is the case with the vast majority of what you could learn.

English has around a million words…

But most native speakers only use around 25,000.

Then there’s the fact that these words can be combined into an infinite number of phrases and expressions, only a small number of which sound natural in every day English.

So you’ve got to choose what you learn wisely.

Or simply let me do the work.

Click here to start your membership.

As well as the weekly lessons to you get access to more than 100 past lessons in the archive, the “Extraordinary English Conversations” series. the monthly EES Gazette through your door (dedicated to executing your English in the real world), feedback and critique on your English from me, access to the Community, and much, much more.

Join Julian Northbrook’s League of Extraordinary English Speakers here

Cheers,

Julian Northbrook
Language Punk. Pneumon… ah screw it.